Al Beatty Grassroots Grande Prairie Realtor

Tagline:
Set standards on integrity, communication and always putting my clients best interest first.

Description:
An agent with local roots who is fiercely connected to the business, social and educational communities, Al provides out of the box thinking with industry leading marketing that results in quicker sales, higher prices and a stress free environment.

Hours:

Timezone: (GMT-06:00) America/Boise

Monday

7:30 am - 10:00 pm

Tuesday

7:30 am - 10:00 pm

Wednesday

7:30 am - 10:00 pm

Thursday

7:30 am - 10:00 pm

Friday

7:30 am - 10:00 pm

Saturday

7:30 am - 10:00 pm

Business Name:
Al Beatty Grassroots Grande Prairie Realtor

Address:
8805 Resources Rd #118
Grande Prairie T8V 3A6
Canada

Phone:
(780) 228-4266

Website:
https://www.albeatty.ca/

Social Media Links

Al Beatty Grassroots Grande Prairie Realtor:

About Grande Prairie

Grande Prairie is a city in northwest Alberta, Canada within the southern portion of an area known as Peace River Country. It is located at the intersection of Highway 43 (part of the CANAMEX Corridor) and Highway 40 (the Bighorn Highway), approximately 456 km (283 mi) northwest of Edmonton. The city is surrounded by the County of Grande Prairie No. 1. Grande Prairie was the seventh-largest city in Alberta in 2016, with a population of 63,166, and was one of Canada's fastest growing cities between 2001 and 2006.The city adopted the trumpeter swan as an official symbol due to its proximity to the migration route and summer nesting grounds of this bird. For that reason, Grande Prairie is sometimes nicknamed the "Swan City". The dinosaur has also emerged as an unofficial symbol of the city due to paleontology discoveries in the areas north and west of Grande Prairie. == History == The Grande Prairie area was historically known as Buffalo Plains, after the buffalo who would traverse the large prairie which lies to the north, east, and west of it. Father Grouard, a Roman Catholic Priest, was the first to refer to the area as La Grande Prairie. In the 18th century, the prairie was occupied by bands of the Dane-zaa (Beaver) peoples, who began, in the early 19th century, trading with the North West Company at Dunvegan.